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August 07 – 14

Posted on Jul 14 , 2016 in Blog

Thursday (11th)

10:00 a.m. COMMUNION

 

Sunday (14th)

8:00 a.m. HOLY COMMUNION – BCP

10:00 a.m. CONTEMPORARY EUCHARIST – BAS

1st Lesson: Isaiah 5:1-7

Epistle: Hebrews 11:29-12:2

Gospel: Luke 12:49-56

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July 31 – August 07

Posted on Jul 14 , 2016 in Blog

Thursday (04th)

10:00 a.m. COMMUNION

 

Sunday (07th)

8:00 a.m. HOLY COMMUNION – BCP

10:00 a.m. CONTEMPORARY EUCHARIST – BAS

1st Lesson: Isaiah 1:1, 10-20

Epistle: Hebrews 11:1-3, 8-16

Gospel: Luke 12:32-40

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April 10 – 17

Posted on Apr 07 , 2016 in Blog

 Sunday (10th) The Annunciation

12:00 Noon EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING – Pastor Paul’s office

 

Monday (11th)

12:00 Noon MONTHLY LUNCHEON – Pioneer Hall – Cost: $4.00/person ALL WELCOME!

7:00 p.m. YOUTH CHOIR PRACTICE – Sanctuary

8:30 p.m. PRAISE BAND PRACTICE – Sanctuary

 

Tuesday (12th)

7:30 p.m. PARISH COUNCIL MEETING – Narthex

 

Wednesday (13th)

7:30 p.m. LENTEN STUDY – ‘Reframe’ Session #10 “Joyful Living” LAST ONE

7:45 p.m. ADULT CHOIR PRACTICE

 

Thursday (14th)

10:00 a.m. COMMUNION

 

Friday (15th)

9:30 a.m. FRIDAY FELLOWSHIP – Sanctuary

 

Saturday (16th)

10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. PARISH COUNCIL RETREAT

6:30 p.m. TAMIL FELLOWSHIP – St. Cuthbert Hall

 

Sunday (17th) Easter 4

8:00 a.m. HOLY COMMUNION – BCP

10:00 a.m. CONTEMPORARY EUCHARIST – BAS

1st Lesson: Acts 9:36-43

Epistle: Revelation 7:9-17

Gospel: John 10:22-30

11:30 a.m. 4th DAY GROUP REUNION – Balcony

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He is not here; He is risen!

Posted on Mar 30 , 2016 in Along the Way

He is not here; He is risen!

Imagine leaving everything behind to follow a Teacher named Jesus. Three years of your life. Three terrifying, confusing, transformational, exhilarating, and exhausting years. And then, an empty tomb. What?!? But God had the care to leave a note in the form of an angelic being. Once again, it was Jesus on the move and the disciples catching up – on so many levels! I thank God for the faithful women who passed on the message! They were to go into Galilee, where they would see Jesus. But didn’t the women bump into Jesus as they were going in haste to deliver this incredible message! When they saw Jesus, they ran to him, grasped his feet, and worshipped him. What a scene! What a blessing! We are told by Matthew that they were frightened but filled with great joy. And Jesus replayed the original message: Don’t be afraid. Tell my brothers to leave for Galilee. They will see me there.

I have been thinking about what it might have been like for Jesus. I have recently spoken with a family about their father who recently died. We had his funeral at St. Cuthbert on Wednesday, March 16. Just a couple of years ago he ran an Ironman Race. An Ironman Triathlon consists of a 2.4-mile (3.86 km) swim, a 112-mile (180.25 km) bicycle ride and a marathon 26.2-mile (42.2 km) run, raced in that order and without a break. To finish such a race must be both crushing and exhilarating. And the days following it must feel so incredible to have accomplished such a feat.

In Hebrews 12:1-3 we get some race commentary: “Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart.”

Jesus ‘endured the cross’ (to bear-up under trials, to have fortitude, to persevere). Where someone in an Ironman Triathlon would train in order to bear-up, to have fortitude and to persevere in spite of suffering, Jesus was in perfect shape to do just that. He even bore torture and a brutal nailing to the cross, with the end being dropped into a three-foot hole in the ground, and then being left to die a horrible death. To die on the cross was considered a shameful thing. Where the adage “If it doesn’t kill you it will make you stronger” may be applied to an “Ironman/woman”, Jesus took the finishing line with him – he broke through the barrier of death, conquering it. The result is that we might go free from the bondage of sin and death and the fear and the shame associated with it. And so he says to the women, “Don’t be afraid!” Jesus had run the race and won the contest, overcoming the many obstacles along the way; throwing them off so that they would not hinder him. He rejected any entanglements that would keep him from accomplishing his task, to finish the race. He didn’t get a medal, he sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. “Sitting down” communicates a completed task. The “right hand” is the place of power and authority.

The race that we are in is called LIFE. We can run it well or poorly. Only God is the judge. And in this case, God is also our running partner, in the person of Jesus Christ, and we, the church, are in training together with him. We are called to fix our eyes on Jesus and to keep going on the course that is marked-out for us by the Word of God, illuminated by the Holy Spirit and traced by other believers. This Easter Season may we also run with endurance – and experience the freedom of doing so. Jesus is on the move today and still giving his followers direction. Let us consider well the leading of Jesus so that we do not grow weary or lose heart. At St. Cuthbert, we have received the rough outline of the race before us through our Vestry Meeting and our first Parish Council Meeting. We will be going on retreat soon to further discern God’s calling and to organize ourselves in such a way that we can best respond and communicate with the body of believers called “the Vestry of St. Cuthbert”. We don’t know what the future holds, but we trust that Jesus is our guide; he has run the race, and empowers us to do the same. From Paul’s letter to the Philippians, “I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus.” (3:14)

Anyone up for a run?

 

Yours along the Way, Pastor Paul

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Advent Letter

Posted on Feb 29 , 2016 in Along the Way

Advent Letter

Advent/Christmas 2015
Some of us look for signs when we are trying to make a decision. “The Bible fell open to such-and-such a passage!” “My girlfriend dumped me!” “I got a raise!” “The biopsy showed it is malignant.” “There are wars and rumors of wars…”
How do we discern the times, and the signs of the times?
Prepare your minds for action! Be self-controlled! Set your hope fully on the grace to be given you when Jesus Christ is revealed! (1 Peter 1:13) And Jesus said, “Be on guard! Be alert! You do not know when that time will come.” (Mark 13:33)
On a more mundane level, signs point the way. As I have learned my way to the church, the sign I most looked out for as I came up 88th was the right turn onto 116th. Now I know to turn there without looking at the sign. We filter out all of the information that we don’t need so that we can focus on the information that will get us to our destination.
Many of us are so flooded with information: signs; symbols; images; and sounds; that if God were to give us a sign it would have to be a significant one – or else we would likely miss it.
The God of mercy has given just such a sign. May we all have eyes to see it and hearts to perceive it.
“Come to Bethlehem to see him whose birth the angels sing. Come adore on bended knee Christ the Lord the newborn King.” (From ‘Angels We Have Heard On High’)
From the Prophet Isaiah, “…The Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel.” (7:14)
And from Matthew’s Gospel, “All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet: “The virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, and they will call him Immanuel” (which means “God with us”). (1:22, 23)
The signs of all the Christmas trappings: the tinsel; the packages and the wrapping; the carols and the lights; the Crèche with the baby Jesus, Joseph, Mary, and the shepherds… all these are signs associated with The Sign, named Immanuel, which means God with us. God is with you and with me in the person of Jesus Christ. This is the good news we have to share. This is the heart of the celebration! And so let us keep the Feast of the 12 days of Christmas.
Gloria! In excelsis Deo!
Yours in Wonder,
Pastor Paul

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February 14 – 21

Posted on Feb 12 , 2016 in Blog & This Week

 Sunday (14th) Lent 1

MOTHERS’ UNION BAKE SALE after 10:00 a.m. Service.

11:30 a.m. 4th DAY GROUP REUNION – Balcony

 

Monday (15th)

10:00 a.m. CHRISTIANITY EXPLORED – Session #4 “The Cross” – Narthex

7:00 p.m. YOUTH CHOIR PRACTICE – Sanctuary

7:00 p.m. CHRISTIANITY EXPLORED – Session #4 “The Cross” -Bert Gunson

8:30 p.m. PRAISE BAND PRACTICE – Sanctuary

 

Wednesday (17th)

7:00 p.m. YOUTH GROUP

7:00 p.m. EVENING PRAYER

7:30 p.m. LENTEN STUDY – ‘Reframe’ led by Pastor Paul. Session #2 “Cultural Stories”

7:45 p.m. ADULT CHOIR PRACTICE

 

Thursday (18th)

10:00 a.m. COMMUNION

12:30 p.m. MOTHERS’ UNION MEETING – Narthex

 

Friday (19th)

9:45 a.m. FRIDAY FELLOWSHIP – Sanctuary

 

Saturday (20th)

6:30 p.m. TAMIL FELLOWSHIP – St. Cuthbert Hall

 

Sunday (21th) Lent 2

8:00 a.m. HOLY COMMUNION – BCP

10:00 a.m. CONTEMPORARY EUCHARIST – BAS

1st Lesson: Genesis 15:1-12, 17-18

Epistle: Philippians 3:17-4:1

Gospel: Luke 13:31-35

12:00 noon ANNUAL VESTRY MEETING – Sanctuary

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September 28 – October 05

Posted on Sep 26 , 2014 in Blog

Monday (29th)

7:00 p.m. YOUTH CHOIR PRACTICE – Sanctuary

8:30 p.m. PRAISE BAND PRACTICE – Sanctuary

 

Wednesday (01st)

7:00 p.m. ADULT CHOIR PRACTICE – Sanctuary – Please use parking lot off 116 Street!

7:00 p.m. YOUTH GROUP – St. Cuthbert Hall – Please use parking lot off 116 Street!

 

Thursday (02nd)

10:00 a.m. EUCHARIST

7:00 p.m. CHRISTIANITY EXPLORED – Session #3 – Narthex – Coffee & desert –

 

Friday (03th)

9:30 a.m. FRIDAY FELLOWSHIP – Family Room

 

Saturday (04th)

10:30 a.m. YOUTH BIBLE STUDY (ages 12-25) – Pioneer Hall –

 

Sunday (05th) St. Michael & All Angels

8:00 a.m. HOLY COMMUNION – BCP

10:00 a.m. CONTEMPORARY EUCHARIST – BAS

1st Lesson: Genesis 28:10-17

Epistle: Revelation 12:7-12

Gospel: John 1:47-51

11:30 a.m. 4th DAY GROUP REUNION – Church balcony

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Did you know this is my last “Did you know?” – August 31

Posted on Aug 28 , 2014 in Did You Know

 Did you know this is my last “Did you know?”

 A few years back I read a book called, “Christianity Rediscoveredby Vincent Donovan. It is a book that I would highly recommend. The story is about a priest who was working at a residential school in Africa. He realizes that the system was not effective in sharing the Gospel and was not helping the students socially. He headed off to live among the tribal people, learn their language, and share the Gospel with them.

 He discovers the Gospel is not something we share, it is something we experience. We are witnesses to the reality of Christ so when Christ becomes the centre of what we are about, then we experience the reality of Christ. In the story he experiences depression because he does not think they are getting the Gospel. The tribal elders minister to him by witnessing to the reality that Christ did show up in their lives. He learns it is not about him. It is all about Christ and Christ shows up once again in his life as well. It articulates in story form the truth of the Gospel. In the end when he leaves, he goes through many emotional experiences. He has come to love the people God brought him to. He knows that the work is not done, and that there is still much to do, but he also knows it is God’s work. He finds comfort in Paul’s writings, where Paul keeps his focus of the victory won for us in Christ, the Kingdom of Heaven to come, and entrusting that it is Christ himself working in us to complete the good work He has started. So with a tear in his eye he heads off to the new call God has for him knowing God will complete the good work God has started in the lives of the people he has come to love.

 So my friends, with a tear in my eye I pray “May the God of peace personally sanctify you entirely; and may your spirit and soul and body be complete and blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. The one who calls you is faithful, and he will do this.” (1 Thessalonians 5:23)

 Your Brother in Christ, Al

 

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Did You Know? August 24

Posted on Aug 20 , 2014 in Did You Know

 Why do all ordained clergy associated with a parish leave when the Rector leaves?

 A few weeks back I wrote about how “all baptized people are called to make Christ known as Saviour and Lord”. It is a direct quote from the ordination service putting the emphasis on what the New Testament calls “the priesthood of all believers“. A church is the gathering of the people of God in a geographical area not a building. Those people together reflect on their call to make Christ known in their unique area. The Bishop is the one “called to guard the faith, unity and discipline of the Church” ensures that the call stays focused on making Christ known.

 However, in a practical sense this is actually an art not a science and as such there are no formulas for doing this. It is to be a “body of Christ” activity. Priests and Deacons are trained to bring leadership, to guide, and direct but they are only one individual in this body. As you all know ordained clergy come and go. When a Rector leaves the church (that is the people of God) is to articulate and discern their call in their Parish (geographical area) and then outline the gifts they believe would help them fulfill this call. To ensure that this is truly the work of the people of God and not the leading of a trained Priest or Deacon, the Bishop has all ordained step aside during this process and remove themselves from the congregation. By very nature Priests and Deacons have their own unique gifts and ideas as to how worship and ministry should be done. It is an art though, not a science, and the body as a whole, needs to do the hard work of discerning the way forward and not default to any trained leadership that might still be present.

 By having all Priests and Deacons remove themselves, the Bishop ensures that this will not happen. When the new Rector arrives they will be new and unknown. If there were clergy who were still connected that were known and familiar to people, the natural tendency would be for people to turn to them, when what is needed is for the new Rector who has been selected to begin to develop pastor roles and leadership.

 In the interim between Rectors, an interim Priest is appointed, who is there to fulfill the Bishops leading in that Parish, without influencing the work of the people.

 The Reverend Allan Carson

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Did you Know? August 17

Posted on Aug 15 , 2014 in Did You Know

 What is the difference in the tasks of Bishop, Priest, and Deacon?

 They are actually different duties of the same task. All three start by making the same declaration. “I solemnly declare that I do believe the holy scriptures of the Old and New Testaments to be the word of God, and contain all things necessary to salvation.” All three “promise to conform to the doctrine, discipline, and worship of the Anglican Church of Canada“.

 The Bishop is “called to be one with the apostles in proclaiming Christ’s Resurrection, interpreting the Gospel, and testifying to Christ’s sovereignty as Lord of lords and King of kings”. The Priest by very nature of relationship with the Bishop is to make the same proclamation through teaching and preaching. The role of teacher is not included in the Deacon’s call.

 The Bishop is “called to guard the faith, unity, and discipline of the church, to celebrate and to provide for the administration of the sacraments of the new covenant” this is accomplished by ordaining Priests as an extension of this work. The Bishop is also “to be in all things a faithful pastor and wholesome example for the entire flock of Christ”. This is accomplished by ordaining Priests and Deacons to share in this task. The main call of the Deacon is to a “special ministry of servanthood, in the name of Jesus Christ you are to serve all people, particularly the poor, the weak, the sick and the lonely”.

 All Bishops, Priests, and Deacons are called to care for people. Priests are also called to teach, preach and preside at the sacraments. Bishops are called to defend the faith and guard the church, keeping it connected world-wide and to accomplish this through their own work and by sending out Priests and Deacons as their co-labourers in the work of Christ. One could conclude then that the bulk of the task is to care for people. Bishops, Priests, and Deacons participate in this, next would be teaching and presiding at sacraments, Bishops and Priests participate in this. The smallest task is overseeing it all and staying connected with the international body, only Bishops do that.

 All Bishops, Priests, and Deacons are “to make Christ, and his redemptive love known, by word and example, to those among whom they live, work, and worship. They are to interpret to the Church the needs, concerns and hopes of the world. At all times their life and teaching are to show Christ’s people that in serving the helpless they are serving Christ himself.”

 The Reverend Allan Carson